Posts in Category : Featured Articles

WOMEN: New Portraits by Annie Leibovitz

WOMEN: New Portraits by Annie Leibovitz
Recently I was fortunate to have the opportunity to view Annie Leibovitz’s WOMEN: New Portraits exhibit. The NYC show was on display in the former Bayview Correctional Facility, the future home of The Women’s Building on the West Side Highway and 20th Street. I could have sat for hours watching the four wall size projection screens displaying images of women from all corners of the world which the photographer began shooting in 1999. The adjacent reading room was a photographer’s dream, containing nearly every book one would want in a photo library. This expansive body of work is currently on a 10 city tour with its final stop in Zurich from January 28, 2017 – February 19, 2017. If you [continue reading...]

Surfaces and Beyond: A Visit With Isabelle Schneider

Surfaces and Beyond: A Visit With Isabelle Schneider
As photography has changed in recent years, so have the artists working in the discipline. They have adapted to new technology, borrowed ideas and materials from other arts, sometimes producing unusual results. Isabelle Schneider is one of these creatives, bringing to her work a strong aesthetic that transcends various methods, materials, and labels. Originally from Northeastern Pennsylvania, Schneider enrolled at FIT/Parsons, creating her own course of study in fashion design, and became interested in photography thinking it would be striking on fabric. In conversation with her, the word “organic” comes up repeatedly, as does a preference for art that isn’t overly precious or artificially set off from the space it occupies. “When you have something that is public like your [continue reading...]

Sid Kaplan: Scenes of the Unfolding City

Sid Kaplan: Scenes of the Unfolding City
He’s a Fifties’ boy from the Bronx, peppery, bantam, and tough–Jake La Motta with an SLR. His knowledge of New York and gelatin silver printing is vast. Not for nothing is he called the “last of a vanishing breed.” But Sid Kaplan is alive and well, thank you, busy documenting the changing face of his beloved town. He was born in the Bronx in 1938 and began photography at age ten. He grew up at a time when color film was coming in, but serious photography still meant black-and-white. And he was very serious from an early age, attending The School of Industrial Arts, hanging around Peerless Camera Store and the Police Athletic League to pick up information and tips. [continue reading...]

Some Mother’s Son: The War Photography of Josephine Herrick

Some Mother’s Son: The War Photography of Josephine Herrick
On December 6th, 1941, Pearl Harbor wasn’t a place on the mind of many Americans, if they knew about it at all. Located on the island of Oahu near Honolulu, it was home to thousands of servicemen and the U.S. Pacific fleet. Danger was thought to be elsewhere, in the war spreading across Europe. America, protected by sea and strong isolationist sentiment, wasn’t involved. That changed the next morning when hundreds of Japanese planes dropped from the sky just before eight. Swooping down on the naval base, they bombed, torpedoed, and strafed till twenty U.S. vessels and hundreds of aircraft were crippled or destroyed. When they departed two hours later, the harbor was black with smoke, the water strewn with [continue reading...]

Talking Covers: A Visit With Albert Tang

Talking Covers: A Visit With Albert Tang
In college, I had a dirty little secret. When shopping for required poetry and lit, I ignored recommended editions in favor of those with the most pleasing cover art. It didn’t matter if there was a fancy essay, author bio, or notes. Art was everything, a key to the magic within. What was Milton without the blood red skies of the Penguin edition? Faulkner without the dilapidated storefronts and desolate fields of the Vintage series? Cheesy now, these images drew me into the text as no dull academic cover ever could. Maybe I shouldn’t have cared, but slightly ashamed, I did. In today’s crowded media market where books compete against film, television, and the Internet, cover art matters more than ever. [continue reading...]