Surfaces and Beyond: A Visit With Isabelle Schneider

Surfaces and Beyond: A Visit With Isabelle Schneider
As photography has changed in recent years, so have the artists working in the discipline. They have adapted to new technology, borrowed ideas and materials from other arts, sometimes producing unusual results. Isabelle Schneider is one of these creatives, bringing to her work a strong aesthetic that transcends various methods, materials, and labels. Originally from Northeastern Pennsylvania, Schneider enrolled at FIT/Parsons, creating her own course of study in fashion design, and became interested in photography thinking it would be striking on fabric. In conversation with her, the word “organic” comes up repeatedly, as does a preference for art that isn’t overly precious or artificially set off from the space it occupies. “When you have something that is public like your [continue reading...]

PWP Chelsea Gallery Show Opens in December

PWP Chelsea Gallery Show Opens in December
Please join Professional Women Photographers on Thursday, December 8th from 6 to 8 pm for the opening of It’s All in the Details at Chelsea’s Atlantic Gallery. In it, PWP members take a close up look at the world around them with some striking and startling results. All the works are small scale (less than 16 inches) and available for sale, as is a catalog of the exhibition. It’s All in the Details Opening: Thursday, December 8th 6–8 pm Show Runs: December 6 – 17, 2016 Atlantic Gallery 548 West 28th Street (between 10th & 11th Ave) Suite 540 (212) 219-3183 – Catherine Kirkpatrick    

Quietly Decisive: The Work of Israeli Photographer Adi Tarkay

Quietly Decisive: The Work of Israeli Photographer Adi Tarkay
I was running through a gallery building in Bushwick when something bold caught my eye. It was work of Israeli photographer Adi Tarkay who is having his first U.S. solo show, Story of Three Halves at Fuchs Projects. The photographs were technically dazzling–high contrast B&W on aluminum–and aesthetically intriguing. Each contained what seemed to be two very different images that functioned like separate panels of a diptych. I was told by the artist that no Photoshop was used, that on his wanderings through New York City, Tel Aviv, Tokyo, and Kyoto, he had discovered and captured these strangely divided scenes in a quiet and very personal decisive moment. Some planes were flattened, while others receded deeply into space. Like two scenes spliced [continue reading...]

Sid Kaplan: Scenes of the Unfolding City

Sid Kaplan: Scenes of the Unfolding City
He’s a Fifties’ boy from the Bronx, peppery, bantam, and tough–Jake La Motta with an SLR. His knowledge of New York and gelatin silver printing is vast. Not for nothing is he called the “last of a vanishing breed.” But Sid Kaplan is alive and well, thank you, busy documenting the changing face of his beloved town. He was born in the Bronx in 1938 and began photography at age ten. He grew up at a time when color film was coming in, but serious photography still meant black-and-white. And he was very serious from an early age, attending The School of Industrial Arts, hanging around Peerless Camera Store and the Police Athletic League to pick up information and tips. [continue reading...]

Some Mother’s Son: The War Photography of Josephine Herrick

Some Mother’s Son: The War Photography of Josephine Herrick
On December 6th, 1941, Pearl Harbor wasn’t a place on the mind of many Americans, if they knew about it at all. Located on the island of Oahu near Honolulu, it was home to thousands of servicemen and the U.S. Pacific fleet. Danger was thought to be elsewhere, in the war spreading across Europe. America, protected by sea and strong isolationist sentiment, wasn’t involved. That changed the next morning when hundreds of Japanese planes dropped from the sky just before eight. Swooping down on the naval base, they bombed, torpedoed, and strafed till twenty U.S. vessels and hundreds of aircraft were crippled or destroyed. When they departed two hours later, the harbor was black with smoke, the water strewn with [continue reading...]