Tag Archives: Catherine Kirkpatrick

John Milisenda: Photography, Family and Time

Dennis ©John Milisenda

Dennis ©John Milisenda

In a personal document, John Milisenda has photographed  his family, mother, father and brother for almost fifty years. These images are in museums and private collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, the New Orleans Museum of Modern Art, and Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris, and have been in over one hundred and thirty shows. Milisenda has taught basic photography, the Zone System and Photographic Chemistry at Drexel University, the New School For Social Research and Parsons School of Design. He has written articles for Modern Photography and Photo Methods Magazine. Currently he works with methods that combine digital and traditional photography. In keeping with his interest in and deep knowledge of photographic processes, he maintains a darkroom in which he mixes all his chemistry, and experiments with various papers and films.

Milisenda is a native New Yorker who found quiet poetry in the Lower East Side neighborhood where he grew up, and in his family which he has photographed over many years. Click here to see a short video photo-essay of his work on his developmentally disabled brother:

Dennis

(May take a minute to load)

- Catherine Kirkpatrick

PWP Member Spotlight: Meryl Meisler at Westbeth Gallery

Meryl_Meisler-3644©Meryl Meisler & Dave Channon

©Meryl Meisler & Dave Channon

Professional Women Photographers’ member Meryl Meisler is featured in Omens of Climate Change at Manhattan’s Westbeth Gallery from February 1 – 16. Her exhibition space (two rooms!) is devoted to her Immersions series featuring New York City landmark buildings submerged under water and filled with aquatic creatures.

PWP: You are known for your tough pictures of Bushwick in the 1980′s. Why did you turn to a subject matter that embraces lightness and whimsey?

MM: In addition to being an art teacher in the New York City school system, I was also a freelance illustrator, and did a lot of work for educational publishers, including the New York Times Science Times, and Scholastic (Sea Otters: Little Clowns of The Sea).

©Meryl Meisler

Fishy Fire Hydrant ©Meryl Meisler

When I was teaching in Bushwick, I started painting directly on my Cibachrome prints in a whimsical fashion. I also became a certified scuba diver, bought an underwater Nikonos camera and flash, and began photographing my underwater adventures in Florida, Mexico, the Bahamas, Honduras and Florida. I read Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea by Jules Verne and had visions of my beloved New York City submerged like Atlantis.

My work was published in Print Magazine and Zoom, and in 1991, I got a call from the art director of a new software company who selected me to come to the Maine Center for Creative Imaging to be among the first artists trained by Apple and Adobe to work on the Macintosh Computer with a new application: Adobe Photoshop. I was hooked, and began making digital images and mixed media sculptures based on aquatic themes.

PWP: What was involved in gaining access to the buildings?

©Meryl Meisler

Mapping ©Meryl Meisler

MM: In 1995, I was selected by the MTA Arts for Transit  to create an installation in twelve light boxes in Grand Central Station. My proposal to was “submerge” the terminal digitally, and I received permission to photograph there with a tripod and medium format camera. The resulting installation, Grand Splash, 1995-1996, was a huge success, the MTA’s first exhibit of digital work. It was featured in WIRED Magazine and Print Magazine, in addition to TimeOut and other periodicals.

I wanted to continue, and worked for three years to get permission to photograph the New York Public Library at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue without paying licensing or rental costs (typically thousands of dollars).

©Meryl Meisler

©Meryl Meisler

I was also commissioned by the MTA Arts for Transit to create Submerged, an edition of 4,000 posters installed throughout the NYC transit system from 2001-2002. It went up on the day of my 50th birthday–what a celebration! I started “turtle watching,” going to every station throughout the city to see my poster, which was also a self portrait. The Submersions series was awarded a NYFA Catalogue grant.

The Immersions series was the main focus of my work from 1991 on, but during a 2002 exhibit at the ISE Cultural Foundation, my world collapsed. My father passed away suddenly, and my mother who had Alzheimer’s, required full time nursing care. I was very close to my parents, and the mourning and loss was deep and profound. After that, Immersions no longer seemed relevant to my life.

PWP: What‘s coming up next?
MM: In June 2014, coinciding with Bushwick Open Studios, I have a solo show, A Tale of Two Cities: Disco Era Bushwick opening at the Bizarre Black Box Gallery. I frequented and documented the hottest NYC discos in the late 70’s early 80’s, but have never shown these pictures. Juxtaposed with Bushwick images from the early 80s and now, the installation will have the look and feel of a disco. The “Bridge and Tunnel” crowd barred from those velvet ropes and disco doors is now the hip crowd!

So many images, so little time!

©Meryl Meisler

©Meryl Meisler

Interview by Catherine Kirkpatrick

 

Lessons Through A Lens: Photographer Irith Gubi

Irith Gubi is freelance and fine art photographer who lives and works in Israel. I met her recently when she visited New York, and was very impressed by a documentary series she did on the residents of Freiman House, a home for people with moderate retardation. Here are some of her images and thoughts about the project.

©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

As a child I loved to draw, but on my eleventh birthday asked my parents for a camera and received a black plastic Agfa Instamatic. Though I loved taking apart and reassembling small appliances, the camera remained intact and I loved using it.

While my mother was the official photographer of family events, I used my new camera to explore my close surroundings. In high school, photography meant spending hours in the dark room. It was only after I started a family and took advanced courses, that I really began to understand and appreciate it.

I am curious by nature, interested in a many things, but most of all in the human experience. The more I was drawn to photography, the more I learned about the world around me, and also about myself. The camera makes it easier to approach people and deal with ambiguous and difficult situations, and also serves as a mirror reflecting myself. Looking at my work, I see issues that concern me, and sometimes solutions to unanswered questions. Photography is one of my strongest passions.

©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

In photography school, as part of a social documentary course, I had an assignment to follow a person or a group, connect and get to know them gradually, then document their everyday life. I was fascinated by the images of the great social photographers and the considerable time and effort they invested in their projects. They were a great inspiration for me, and I was determined to find a special group of people that I could get to know.

In my city of Givataim, next to Tel Aviv, I used to see an unusual group of people passing through my quiet neighborhood. Their posture and body language suggested they were less aware of themselves than ordinary people, and some were very friendly and waved at passersby on the street. I was curious as to who they were and where they were going, and one morning found myself following a man from the group. I felt somewhat unethical, but was determined to satisfy my curiosity.

Yoram felt he was being followed, and increased his speed, and soon I was looking at myself from the outside–running down the street after a man I did not know. He went into the local grocery store, and I could hear his loud voice saying good morning to the shopkeeper. Then he came out, walking quickly, looking back at me until we reached the gate of a one-story building.

©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

A sign said it was an employment center for people with disabilities. It took nearly three months for me to get all the approvals needed to join and photograph the group members at the employment center and the institution called Freiman House, where they lived and spent most of their time.

Freiman House residents suffer from mild to moderate mental retardation, and range in age from forty to to sixty-five. Most are independent and able to care for themselves to some extent; those who are less independent receive help and assistance from caregivers. They work at the employment center seven hours a day, five days a week and are engaged in a variety of easy crafts like binding cardboard folders, putting together small paper and wood decorations, counting teaspoons and putting them in bags. They are paid for their work.

©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

Following my teachers’ guidelines, I visited the institution for the first time without a camera, introducing myself, telling the residents about the purpose of my project. Some of them were friendly and quick to connect. They wanted to know my age, the name of my husband, how many children I had. Some were less verbal, and I was especially impressed by one woman who suffered from depression and rarely spoke. She had a huge amount of emotional energy, and would hug me several times during each visit. Her embrace was strong and intense, it took me a while to get used to this gesture.

IG_Man_Under_Covers©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

One man was very frustrated and troubled by the deterioration of his walking ability, and his speech was also very unclear. At the beginning of the project, he came up from behind, placed his hand strongly on my shoulder and terrified me. But I learned this was his way to communicate. I asked him not to repeat this, and he never did it again. Another woman who suffered from developmental disability was considered the most intelligent member of the group. On my first visit, she told me she did not belong there but had no other place to go. She was very clear in expressing who she liked and disliked, and though suspicious of me at first, developed trust as the project progressed.

©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

After a few visits, when I finally came with a camera, everyone was curious and asked me to take their picture. I agreed, though these were not the kind of images I wanted to take. I wanted them to be unaware of me, hoping that they would go about their usual tasks so I could see their true, authentic behavior. Although they knew how to “act” in front of the camera, it was their genuineness and true nature I was after. This is what fascinates me when I photograph people–the real, unstaged situations where a true moment or sentiment can reveal something deep in a person’s soul.

©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

Winning their trust was dependent on the time I spent there, and after a few weeks they almost didn’t notice me or the camera, and I could avoid superficial visuals that would show them in a trite or undignified way. Whenever I came to photograph them, they seemed content, and I think  the photographic work made them feel important in their own eyes.

At the end of the course, I had a small body of work based on our short acquaintance, but felt it was not sufficient. I invited the group to the graduate exhibition at my school, and was moved to see their excitement when they saw themselves in pictures on the wall.

©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

After graduation, I photographed Freiman House residents for more than a year and a half, resulting in an exhibition held at the town’s main gallery. The group members were also present at the opening, some accompanied by their families. Later the project earned an honorable mention at the PX3 photography competition in Paris.

The experience made me think about living in a place where others make all decisions for you about every aspect of your life. I also thought about the advantages of being in an environment where you get shelter and support without having to worry about your needs or reality beyond the walls.

©Irith Gubi

©Irith Gubi

Most of all, I was deeply touched. The residents taught me without words, in their own unique language, to be more empathic toward others, to accept and embrace all people regardless of their capabilities and limitations. Getting to know these special people was a life lesson for me and helped me appreciate the beauty in each and every human being.

– By Irith Gubi

– Edited by Catherine Kirkpatrick

 

Cause, Paws & Art: Photographers Helping Animals

©Lisa Prince Fishler

©Lisa Prince Fishler

As the owner of Printz Photography, Lisa Prince Fishler photographs pets for a living. But she has always been moved by the plight of the many animals that are euthanized each year, and in 2010, founded HeARTs Speak, an organization dedicated to bringing artists together to save the lives of animals in need.

HeARTs Speak is unique in that it works to secure stipends and other incentives so artists can work on behalf of animal causes without consequences to their own businesses, encourages relationships with third-party partners that can provide exposure for the artists, and offers educational opportunities that use art to bridge the work of animal welfare organizations and the communities they serve.

It is a thoughtful, creative and forward-looking organization that takes into account the realistic needs of all parties. From their website it is clear they are talented, have very big hearts, and love animals. It is truly a case of someone doing what they love to change the world.

©Lisa Prince Fishler

©Lisa Prince Fishler

PWP:  What led you to actually do something for your cause rather than just make a financial contribution? Was there a specific animal/image/moment that affected you so deeply you had to so something about it?

LPF:  My personal handicap is I WANT to save the world. Especially for animals. I have always connected deeply with them and find them to be amazing beyond words on so many levels and just cannot accept the fact millions die in shelters each year. For this reason, I volunteered my services to help animals in rescues. I would walk and spend time with them, and one day started photographing them as well. I was told that my photographs helped show their character better than the snapshots the shelter/rescue staff took, and helped them find homes more quickly as a result. People who saw my photographs started inquiring about having me photograph their dogs privately, and hence, my business was born.

©Lisa Prince Fishler

©Lisa Prince Fishler

I always knew a lot of animals lost their lives in high intake shelters, however, it was not until I actually watched a video that showed sweet, loving, beautiful dogs and cats, led down the hall to be put to sleep that I decided I had to do more. There were rooms and garbage containers overflowing with the bodies of dogs, puppies, cats and kittens. I could not stop the video, instead, I watched through my tears and sobbing and grew determined to come up with a way to stop this insanity. I thought about how if I could afford to, I would only do the work that saves lives. I wouldn’t even think twice to choose photographing animals in shelters over private clients’ pets. This, coupled with my belief that there is power in numbers served as the catalyst for HeARTs Speak. HeARTs Speak would be a 501c3 umbrella for like-minded artists, and it would raise the funds necessary to let these artists choose to do the work that gives back to animals in need.

PWP:  What are the figures like? Roughly how many animals in the United States live in shelters? Are abused? Are euthanized?

©Lisa Prince Fishler

©Lisa Prince Fishler

LPF:  According to the Humane Society of the United States, “animal shelters care for 6-8 million dogs and cats every year in the United States, of whom approximately 3-4 million are euthanized.”

I do not believe there is a resource that keeps track of how many are abused.

PWP:  On your website you speak about the conflict between photographing for pay and photographing for a cause. Can you talk a little about this issue that all photographers have to deal with? How do you draw boundaries?

LPF:  Again, this is the premise upon which HeARTs Speak was founded. We have close to 400 members in 11 countries. We all provide services for no charge to help animals in shelters and rescues. I don’t think, however, there’s anything wrong with receiving compensation for doing this important work and this is something we, as an organization, are working to change this. We are working to raise the funds to provide a stipend to our members each time they go to a shelter or rescue to enable them to make the choice to help more animals, if they so desire. There are lots of people in this world that make lots of money for doing bad things. We think it’s not a lot to ask to simply make enough to sustain ourselves, doing good.

PWP:  Can you tell us about a case where photographing an animal changed the life of that animal?

LPF:  It happens all the time. An animal is on death row, we photograph them, and then share that image via our social network via the internet, and that animals is saved. That is what we do!

©Susan J. Kuhlman

©Susan J. Kuhlman

– Catherine Kirkpatrick

Rivka Katvan – An Appreciation by Harriet Whelchel

Through a Lens Brightly: Women, Photography & Change –
A Blog Series in Honor of Women’s History Month.
Laura Linney & Jennifer Carpenter - The Crucible, 2002 ©Rivka Katvan

Laura Linney & Jennifer Carpenter – The Crucible, 2002 ©Rivka Katvan

Photographer Rivka Shifman Katvan creates diverse narratives that range from intimate backstage scenes during Broadway plays, the daily existence of eccentric Catskills villagers, the mysterious lives of mannequins reflected in store windows, and fairy tale-like scenes of Coney Island. Her work has been widely celebrated throughout New York’s artistic and theatrical communities, including Gallery 138, the International Center of Photography, the Museum of the City of New York, and the Museum of Television and Radio. She has also been featured in numerous publications in print and online, including The Guardian Weekend Magazine, The New York Times, as well as www.kodak.com and www.lanciatrendvisions.com.

Alan Cumming - Cabaret, 1998 ©Rivka Katvan

Alan Cumming – Cabaret, 1998 ©Rivka Katvan

Katvan’s relationship with the theater originated in 1978 during a backstage visit to a friend who was appearing in The Magic Show. She was immediately struck by the contrast between the illusions being created onstage and the down-to-earth reality of backstage life. Katvan soon became a backstage fixture, learning how to be discreet in other people’s private spaces, putting them at ease and gaining their trust, enabling her to catch fleeting glimpses of beloved Broadway stars like Alan Cumming, Natasha Richardson, Liam Neeson, and Elizabeth Taylor.

Elizabeth Taylor - The Little Foxes, 1981 ©Rivka Katvan

Elizabeth Taylor – The Little Foxes, 1981 ©Rivka Katvan

For many years the only fine-art photographer allowed to document backstage on Broadway during the Tony Awards, Katvan developed a special bond with the theatrical community. Feeling the need to give back to those who had embraced her so wholeheartedly, she contacted the nonprofit organization Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS in the early 1990s, offering to donate photographs to a charity auction. Since then she has made the group part of her extended family, speaking out for the cause, participating in fundraising events, and commemorating many of their efforts with her camera. According to Tom Viola, executive director of Broadway Cares, Katvan’s photographs have raised more than $120,000 for the organization.

Cyndi Lauper - The Threepenny Opera, 2006 ©Rivka Katvan

Cyndi Lauper – The Threepenny Opera, 2006 ©Rivka Katvan

In 2006, Katvan extended her backstage photography to New York’s Sing Sing Correctional Facility, documenting inmates (many serving life sentences) as they rehearsed the play Oedipus Rex, performed over four nights. In 2011, she participated in the State Department’s Art in Embassies program, which places artists’ works in consulates and embassies around the world in an effort to show “how art can transcend national borders and build connections among peoples.€ Her lyrical scenes of Central Park covered in snow and the Brooklyn Bridge enveloped in fog presented a strong contrast with the year-round hot climate of Djibouti, Africa, where they were shown.

Brooklyn Bridge, 2007 ©Rivka Katvan

Brooklyn Bridge, 2007 ©Rivka Katvan

_________________________________

Harriet Whelchel has been an art-book editor for more than twenty-five years, first at Abrams, Inc., and most recently as senior editor at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Currently a freelance editor, she has edited and managed projects for private clients and publishing companies, including Abrams, The Metropolitan Museum, and Rizzoli New York. She is proud to have edited Rivka Katvan’s book Backstage: Broadway Behind the Curtain (Abrams, 2001).

Glenn Close - Barnum, 1980 ©Rivka Katvan

Glenn Close – Barnum, 1980 ©Rivka Katvan

(Rivka Shifman Katvan will be speaking about her work at  Professional Women Photographers on May 8th, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, at the Metropolitan Opera Guild, 70 Lincoln Center Plaza, West 65th Street between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue. The public is welcome, $10 at the door for non-members. For more information, call 917-304-4354.)

Links to other articles in Through a Lens Brightly: Women, Photography & Change:

Introduction

Gigi Stoll: Inspiration All Over the World

Of Her Time & Way Ahead: Beth Wilson on Maggie Sherwood

Tanya Sleiman: Capturing Elusive Photographer Helen Levitt on Film

Rivka Katvan: An Appreciation by Harriet Whelchel